September 17, 2014

betype:

[arty]cmonkeys

(via botanicalgardens)

September 16, 2014

ryanpanos:

Movie Theaters in South India | Stefanie Zoche

(via anastasiamaudelen)

September 16, 2014

zayrn:

there’s literally no point in teaching girls to be body positive if you only use men’s opinions for validation like “boys like girls with curves” nah get that the fuck out of here

(via cosmicbreaker)

September 16, 2014
alex-maclean:

Orange Tree Farm, Clearwater, FL 2007

alex-maclean:

Orange Tree Farm, Clearwater, FL 2007

(via sociology-of-space)

September 16, 2014
"Marx understood that the value of anything came from the hands of the maker. Marx of the Jews, tribal people of the desert, Marx the tribal man understood that nothing personal or individual mattered because no individual could survive without others. Generation after generation, individuals were born, then after eighty years, disappeared into dust, but in the stories, the people lived on in the imaginations and hearts their descendants. Wherever their stories were told, the spirits of the ancestors were present and their power was alive.

Marx, tribal man and storyteller; Marx with his primitive devotion to the workers’ stories. No wonder the Europeans had hated him! Marx had gathered official government reports of the suffering of English factory workers the way a tribal shaman might have, feverishly working to bring together a powerful, even magical, assembly of stories. In the repetition of the workers’ stories lay great power; workers must never forget the stories of other workers. The people did not struggle alone. Marx, more tribal Jew than European, instinctively knew the stories, or “history,” accumulated momentum and power. No factory inspector’s “official report” could whitewash the tears, blood, and sweat that glistened from the simple words of the narrative.

Marx had understood stories are alive with the energy words generate. Word by word, the stories of suffering, injury, and death had transformed the present moment, seizing listeners’ or readers’ imaginations so that for an instant, they were present and felt the suffering of sisters and brothers long past. The words of the stories filled rooms with an immense energy that aroused the living with fierce passion and determination for justice. Marx wrote about babies dosed with opium while mothers labored sixteen hours in silk factories; Marx wrote with the secret anguish of a father unable to provide enough food or medicine. When Marx wrote about the little children working under huge spinning machines that regularly mangled and killed them, Marx had already seen Death prowling outside his door, hungry for his own three children. In his feverish work with the stories of shrunken, yellowed infants, and the mangled limbs of children, Marx had been working desperately to seize the story of each child-victim and turn the story away from the brutal endings the coroners and factory inspectors used to write for the children of the poor. His own children were slowly dying from cold, lack of food, and medicine; yet day after day, Marx had returned to official reports in the British Museum. Wage-earning might have saved Marx’s children, but tribal man and storyteller, Marx had sacrificed the lives of his own beloved children to gather the stories of all the children starved and mangled. He had sensed the great power these stories had— power to move millions of people."

Almanac of the Dead, Leslie Marmon Silko

The context is an indigenous woman located on what is basically a reservation in Mexico that’s about to rise up to try to take back their land is being asked by people to explain why she is so devoted to Marx. People in her tribe are understandably suspicious of all European value systems and scared of being betrayed by one of their own, so she’s trying to explain Marx to them in a way that they can understand given that most of them have only lived on that reservation in utter poverty and have only heard what missionaries told them. 

Throughout the novel she encounters this white, cuban grossly sexist shitty revolutionary who is also viciously racist against indigenous people (like, planning to kill them because they’re too ‘tribalist’ ‘backward’) and constantly pisses him off because she has a better grasp of marx even tho he’s educated and she isn’t. She has his ass executed.

(via obsidian-always)

(via socio-logic)

September 16, 2014
My heart is sore right now.

Seeing my family is simultaneously uplifting and profoundly saddening.

1:22pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z9sIJy1Qzj41r
  
Filed under: thoughts 
September 16, 2014

Brad Pitt (1988)

(Source: 80slove, via stylebyyener)

September 16, 2014
explore-blog:

In 1973, Hannah Arendt became the first woman to speak at the prestigious Gifford Lectures — an annual series established in 1888 aiming “to promote and diffuse the study of natural theology in the widest sense of the term,” bridging science, philosophy, and spirituality. Titled The Life of the Mind, her lecture, later expanded into a book, is a spectacular meditation on thinking vs. knowing and the difference between truth and meaning.

explore-blog:

In 1973, Hannah Arendt became the first woman to speak at the prestigious Gifford Lectures — an annual series established in 1888 aiming “to promote and diffuse the study of natural theology in the widest sense of the term,” bridging science, philosophy, and spirituality. Titled The Life of the Mind, her lecture, later expanded into a book, is a spectacular meditation on thinking vs. knowing and the difference between truth and meaning.

September 16, 2014
"There is nothing more beautiful than seeing a person being themselves. Imagine going through your day being unapologetically you."

— Steve Maraboli (via exoticwild)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

September 16, 2014
"That’s the whole trouble. You can’t ever find a place that’s nice and peaceful, because there isn’t any. You may think there is, but once you get there, when you’re not looking, somebody’ll sneak up and write Fuck you right under your nose."

J.D. SalingerThe Catcher in the Rye (via wordsnquotes)

(via botanicalgardens)

September 15, 2014
Couldn’t resist an #elevatorselfie

Couldn’t resist an #elevatorselfie

9:52pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z9sIJy1Qx5F-G
  
Filed under: elevatorselfie 
September 15, 2014
queenqueerqutie:


Martin Bauendahl


Real life vs Societal expectations

queenqueerqutie:

Martin Bauendahl

Real life vs Societal expectations

(Source: denicedenice)

September 15, 2014

theilluminatormobilizer:

The Illuminator projected this near the Brooklyn Bridge in solidarity with the people of Ferguson.

(via amberrosesshavedhead)

September 14, 2014
enchantedsleeper:

Jüngling in Harnisch, Wilhelm Trübner

enchantedsleeper:

Jüngling in HarnischWilhelm Trübner

September 14, 2014
"There is no shame in being hungry for another person. There is no shame in wanting very much to share your life with somebody."

— Augusten Burroughs  (via her0inchic)

(Source: mycontinuum, via pourquoi-nutmeg)

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